Gems of Wisdom: You can make this day whatever you want it to be.

Tempo de leitura: menos de 1 minuto

Jack Scholes

You can make this day whatever you want it to be. The very moment you wake up in the morning you can decide what sort of day it is going to be for you. It can be the most wonderful imaginable, but it is up to you. You are free to make the choice. Be determined to be ultra-positive today, to expect the very best and draw it to you. Have absolute faith and confidence that you can and will do it.

Eileen Caddy

Do and make
Do and make are very general words and can sometimes be confused. Here are some tips.

1. We use do when the exact activity is not stated, especially with words like thing, something, nothing, anything.

  • What are you doing over the weekend?
  • I feel like doing nothing for a change.

2. We use do to talk about work and jobs.

  • What do you do for a living?
  • She did her homework before dinner.

3. We often use make to talk about building, constructing, creating. SYN – create, develop, produce, generate, form.

  • He once made a small fishing boat with his brother.
  • Let’s make the dinner first and then we can make a cake.
  • They made plans to leave the country.

4. Do and make are important verbs which have hardly any meaning on their own, but which are part of many fixed expressions and common collocations. For example:

  • Do
    • the shopping, the cooking, the ironing, the washing-up, good, harm, business, one’s best, a favour, sport, exercise, 80 miles per hour, crosswords, a play, drugs.
  • Make
    • a meal, a bed, a journey, an offer, a difference, a fuss, conversation, certain, sure, arrangements, a suggestion, an impression, a decision, a mess, an attempt, a point, an effort, an excuse, an exception, a mistake, a noise, a joke, a phone call, money, a profit, a fortune, love, peace, war, a fire, progress.

Cf. Falsas Gêmeas: DO x MAKE
Cf. Mais Frases Célebres

Referência: “Gems of Wisdom – Inspirational Messages to Enhance the Quality of Your Life and Improve Your English” de Jack Scholes – Disal Editora, 2007. Leia a resenha.